National Congress of American Indians – Response to Political Slurs

National Congress of American Indians pic

National Congress of American Indians
Image: ncai.org

Mark Macarro is a leader in California’s American Indian community. He is serving his 14th year as tribal chairman for the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. Mark Macarro concurrently serves on the board of governors for the National Congress of the American Indians (NCAI).

Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians is the nation’s oldest organization representing the interests of American Indians and Native peoples. It advocates for beneficial policies and initiatives on a consensus basis, considering the viewpoints and concerns of tribes and tribal governments throughout the United States.

While the NCAI routinely fights against discriminatory and inflammatory conduct, it does not typically respond to name calling and inflammatory dialogue in politics. In May 2017, however, the wholly bi-partisan organization released a statement condemning particularly insensitive remarks made by the nation’s president.

President Trump used the name Pocahontas as an insult to attack Senator Elizabeth Warren, one of his political opponents. Stakeholders at the NCAI object to the use of her name as a racial slur. Pocahontas was a real American Indian, and her legacy is very important to the Pamunkey Indian Tribe in particular. The NCAI statement condemns this behavior and expresses hope that the current administration will work positively with American Indian stakeholders in the future.

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NCAI Praises Decision to Place Alaskan Tribal Land in Indian Trust

National Congress of American Indians pic

National Congress of American Indians
Image: ncai.org

Mark Macarro has served in leadership with the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians for 25 years, holding the position of tribal chairman since 2002. As part of his current duties, Mark Macarro represents the Pechanga Band in the National Congress of American Indians.

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) recently announced its support of the Department of the Interior’s agreement with the Craig Tribal Association to include a 1.08-acre tract of Alaskan land as part of the federal Indian trust. NCAI president Brian Cladoosby lauded the move as a boon for tribes in Alaska and one that will serve to preserve these areas for the tribe member’s descendants for years to come.

The land in question is home to key governmental areas for the tribe, such as its town hall and courthouse. In his comments, Cladoosby noted that when tribes have authority over their lands, they are better able to police themselves and address public safety issues.

An Overview of NCAI’s Native Vote Campaign

 

National Congress of American Indians pic

National Congress of American Indians
Image: nativevote.org

Since 2002, Mark Macarro has led the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians as tribal chairman. Over the years, Mark Macarro has held leadership positions in other organizations, such as the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), a nonprofit group that works to improve the lives and protect the rights of Native people.

NCAI oversees several informational and educational campaigns that aim to encourage tribal citizens to take an active role in their communities. Since NCAI was founded over 70 years ago, it has worked to protect voting rights for Native Americans and involve more community members in the voting process.

Today, NCAI continues this work through Native Vote, a nonpartisan national campaign that educates American Indians about candidates and ballot measures and oversees voter registration activities. Native Vote also educates voters about their rights and collects data about the voting patterns of Native people. Currently, Native Vote participants across the country are hard at work educating community members and preparing them for the upcoming November 2016 election.